War

The Silver Fleet (1943)

3/5 (1)

The Silver Fleet is a British World War II film released in 1943, directed by Vernon Sewell and Gordon Wellesley. The film tells the story of Jaap van Leyden (Ralph Richardson), a Dutch businessman who decides to use his yacht-building skills to aid the British war effort.

Jaap’s plan is to build a secret submarine base for the British in occupied Holland. With the help of his loyal employees, he converts his shipyard into a front for the resistance movement. They use the cover of building luxury yachts for the Germans to secretly construct a fleet of submarines for the British.

However, the Gestapo begins to suspect Jaap’s activities, and he is arrested and interrogated. But even under torture, Jaap refuses to reveal the truth about his work. Meanwhile, his wife Helene (Googie Withers) and his employees carry on his mission, risking their lives to complete the construction of the submarines and get them safely to the waiting British Navy.

In the end, the submarines are launched successfully and destroy a German battleship, earning Jaap and his team the gratitude of the British Admiralty. The film ends with Jaap receiving a knighthood for his bravery and ingenuity in the face of danger.

Directors:
Vernon Sewell, Gordon Wellesley

Writer:
Vernon Sewell, Gordon Wellesley, Emeric Pressburger

Stars:
Ralph Richardson, Googie Withers, Esmond Knight

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Aerial Gunner (1943)

3/5 (1)

“Aerial Gunner” is a World War II film released in 1943, directed by William H. Pine and starring Richard Arlen and Chester Morris. The film tells the story of a group of aerial gunners who are sent on a mission to bomb a Japanese base in the Philippines.

The film begins with the introduction of the main character, Sergeant Johnny Cates (played by Richard Arlen), who is a veteran aerial gunner. Cates is assigned to a new crew, led by Captain Jeff Young (played by Chester Morris), and together they embark on a dangerous mission to bomb a Japanese base in the Philippines.

As they make their way to the base, the crew encounters various challenges, including enemy fire and mechanical difficulties. Despite these obstacles, they manage to successfully drop their bombs and return to their base.

However, the crew soon discovers that their mission was not as successful as they had thought, and they must return to the Philippines to finish the job. This time, they face even greater challenges, including a Japanese fighter pilot who is determined to take them down.

In the end, the crew manages to complete their mission and return safely to their base. The film ends with Cates and his crew receiving praise for their bravery and skill, and with a message of hope for victory in the war.

Directors:
William H. Pine

Writer:
Maxwell Shane, Jack F. Dailey

Stars:
Richard Arlen, Chester Morris, Amelita Ward

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Private Snuffy Smith (1942)

3/5 (1)

“Private Snuffy Smith” is a comedy film released in 1942, directed by Edward F. Cline and starring Bud Duncan, Edgar Kennedy, and Sarah Padden.

The film tells the story of Snuffy Smith (Bud Duncan), a lazy hillbilly who is drafted into the Army during World War II. Snuffy is initially resistant to military life and spends much of his time avoiding work and causing trouble.

However, Snuffy’s life takes a turn when he falls in love with a nurse named Miss Dottie (Mary Ainslee). To impress her, Snuffy decides to shape up and become a model soldier.

As Snuffy begins to take his military duties seriously, he also helps his fellow soldiers in various ways, such as by using his hunting skills to provide food for the unit.

The film features several humorous moments, including Snuffy’s attempts to master military drill and his interactions with the strict Sergeant McGurk (Edgar Kennedy).

In the end, Snuffy proves himself as a loyal and capable soldier, and he is awarded a medal for his bravery.

“Private Snuffy Smith” was made during World War II and served as a lighthearted reminder of the importance of patriotism and service to one’s country. The film combined comedy with elements of drama and romance, and featured a colorful cast of characters. It remains a nostalgic look back at the wartime era and a reminder of the spirit of American resilience and humor.

Directors:
Edward F. Cline

Writer:
Billy DeBeck, John Grey, Jack Henley

Stars:
Bud Duncan, Edgar Kennedy, Sarah Padden

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Martyrs of the Alamo (1915)

3/5 (1)

“Martyrs of the Alamo” is a silent historical epic film released in 1915, directed by Christy Cabanne and starring Sam De Grasse, Allan Sears, and Walter Long.

The film tells the story of the 1836 Battle of the Alamo in San Antonio, Texas, during the Texas Revolution. The Alamo was a fortified mission complex that was defended by a small group of Texian (American) soldiers against a much larger Mexican army led by General Santa Anna (played by Sam De Grasse).

The film portrays the bravery and sacrifice of the Texian soldiers who fought to the death to defend the Alamo against overwhelming odds. Among the defenders were legendary figures such as Davy Crockett (played by Allan Sears) and Jim Bowie (played by Wallace Reid).

Despite the overwhelming Mexican forces, the Texians held out for 13 days before being overrun and killed. The film depicts the final battle in vivid detail, including the famous cry of “Remember the Alamo!” that became a rallying cry for Texians in their fight for independence.

“Martyrs of the Alamo” was a landmark film in the history of cinema, with its epic scale and realistic battle scenes. The film was also notable for its use of location shooting, with many scenes filmed on location at the actual Alamo mission in San Antonio. The film remains a classic example of the historical epic genre and a tribute to the bravery and sacrifice of the defenders of the Alamo.
Directors:
Christy Cabanne

Writer:
Christy Cabanne, Theodosia Harris

Stars:
Sam De Grasse, Allan Sears, Walter Long

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Texas to Bataan (1942)

3/5 (1)

“Texas to Bataan” is a war drama film released in 1942, directed by Robert Emmett Tansey and starring John ‘Dusty’ King, Dave O’Brien, and Marjorie Reynolds.

The film tells the story of a group of Texas National Guard soldiers who are called to duty and sent to the Philippines to fight the Japanese during World War II. The soldiers, led by Captain Bill Marshall (John ‘Dusty’ King), are ill-prepared for the harsh realities of combat, but they soon learn to rely on each other for survival.

Once in the Philippines, the soldiers are met with a brutal enemy and a harsh environment. They struggle with hunger, thirst, and disease as they fight to defend their country and hold their ground against the Japanese.

As the war rages on, the soldiers are pushed to their limits, and their bravery and perseverance are put to the test. Along the way, they form deep bonds of brotherhood and camaraderie that sustain them through the toughest of times.

“Texas to Bataan” was made in the midst of World War II and served as a tribute to the bravery and sacrifice of the soldiers who fought in the conflict. The film is an inspiring story of resilience and courage in the face of overwhelming adversity, and it remains a testament to the heroism of those who served their country during one of its darkest hours.

Directors:
Robert Emmett Tansey

Writer:
Arthur Hoerl

Stars:
John ‘Dusty’ King, David Sharpe, Max Terhune

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Becky Sharp (1935)

3/5 (1)

“Becky Sharp” is a 1935 British film directed by Rouben Mamoulian and starring Miriam Hopkins, Frances Dee, and Cedric Hardwicke. The movie is based on the novel “Vanity Fair” by William Makepeace Thackeray, which tells the story of a poor girl named Becky Sharp who tries to climb the social ladder by any means necessary.

The movie follows Becky Sharp, a young woman who lives in a society where money and status are the keys to success. She is determined to rise above her humble origins and become a member of the wealthy elite. Becky’s first opportunity comes when she is hired as a governess for Sir Pitt Crawley’s children. While working for Sir Pitt, Becky meets his two sons, Rawdon and Pitt Jr., and quickly sets her sights on Rawdon, a handsome but poor military officer.

Becky and Rawdon elope, but their marriage is not accepted by Rawdon’s family. Despite this setback, Becky continues to pursue her dreams of wealth and status. She becomes the mistress of the wealthy Marquess of Steyne, who provides her with everything she desires. However, her association with the Marquess leads to her downfall when he dies suddenly, leaving her with nothing.

In the end, Becky is left with nothing but her beauty and charm, but she refuses to give up. She uses her wits and cunning to start over again, determined to succeed at any cost. The movie ends with Becky walking off into the sunset, ready to take on whatever challenges lie ahead.

Overall, “Becky Sharp” is a captivating and entertaining movie that showcases the talents of its cast and director. It explores the themes of ambition, social climbing, and the corrupting influence of wealth and power.

Directors:
Rouben Mamoulian

Writer:
William Makepeace Thackeray, Francis Edward Faragoh, Langdon Mitchell

Stars:
Miriam Hopkins, Frances Dee, Cedric Hardwicke

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In Which We Serve (1942)

4/5 (1)

“In Which We Serve” is a British wartime drama film released in 1942. It was directed by Noël Coward and David Lean and starred Noël Coward himself, along with John Mills, Bernard Miles, and Celia Johnson. The film tells the story of the crew of HMS Torrin, a British destroyer that is sunk during the Battle of Crete in 1941.

The film opens with the sinking of the Torrin, and then flashes back to tell the story of the ship and her crew. The ship is commanded by Captain Edward Kinross (Noël Coward), who is a strict but fair leader. The crew includes Ordinary Seaman “Shorty” Blake (John Mills), Seaman Freda Lewis (Celia Johnson), and Stoker Petty Officer “Ali” Hakim (Bernard Miles), among others.

Through a series of flashbacks, we see the crew members’ personal lives and how they came to be on the Torrin. We see the ship’s training exercises and its deployment to the Mediterranean, where it participates in the Battle of Crete. During the battle, the Torrin is hit by a bomb and sinks, but the surviving crew members are rescued.

The film ends with the crew back on shore, reflecting on their experiences and their comrades who did not make it back. In the final scene, Captain Kinross addresses the families of the fallen crew members, telling them that their loved ones “died in a service they loved and understood.”

The film was a critical and commercial success and was nominated for several Academy Awards. It is widely considered a classic of British cinema and is noted for its patriotic message and portrayal of the courage and sacrifice of the British Navy during World War II.

Directors:
Noël Coward, David Lean

Writer:
Noël Coward

Stars:
Noël Coward, John Mills, Bernard Miles

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Night Train To Munich (1940)

4/5 (1)

“Night Train to Munich” is a 1940 British thriller directed by Carol Reed and starring Margaret Lockwood, Rex Harrison, and Paul Henreid. The movie tells the story of a British secret agent who goes undercover in Nazi Germany to rescue a Czech scientist and his daughter.

The film begins with the Nazi invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1938. The Czech scientist Axel Bomasch (played by James Harcourt) is captured and taken to Germany to work on a top-secret weapon for the Nazis. His daughter, Anna (played by Lockwood), is also taken into custody, but manages to escape to England with the help of a British secret agent, Gus Bennett (played by Harrison).

When the Nazis learn that Anna has escaped, they send their top agent, Captain Axel von Aschenbach (played by Henreid), to track her down. Gus and Anna are forced to go undercover and travel to Germany on the titular “Night Train to Munich” in order to rescue her father.

Once in Germany, Gus and Anna are aided by a variety of characters, including a sympathetic Gestapo agent and a resourceful cabaret singer. However, they are also pursued by Captain von Aschenbach and must use all of their wits and resources to evade capture.

“Night Train to Munich” is a tense and suspenseful film that explores themes of patriotism, sacrifice, and bravery in the face of danger. The movie’s strong performances and intricate plot twists keep viewers on the edge of their seats, while its message of hope and perseverance is both inspiring and uplifting.

Directors:
Carol Reed

Writer:
Gordon Wellesley, Sidney Gilliat, Frank Launder

Stars:
Margaret Lockwood, Rex Harrison, Paul Henreid

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One of Our Aircraft Is Missing (1942)

4/5 (1)

“One of Our Aircraft Is Missing” is a 1942 British war film directed by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, and starring Godfrey Tearle, Eric Portman, and Hugh Williams. The movie tells the story of a bomber crew whose plane is shot down over the Netherlands during a bombing mission over Germany in World War II.

The film begins with the crew taking off on their mission, but their plane is hit by enemy fire and they are forced to bail out. The crew members are scattered across the Dutch countryside and must work together to evade capture by the Germans and make their way back to safety in England.

The movie portrays the bravery and determination of the Dutch resistance fighters who help the British airmen, risking their own lives to shelter them from the Nazis. The airmen must navigate the unfamiliar terrain and face numerous obstacles along the way, including a German patrol and a treacherous river crossing.

As they make their way through enemy territory, the airmen must rely on their training and the kindness of strangers to survive. They also learn important lessons about courage, sacrifice, and the value of teamwork.

“One of Our Aircraft Is Missing” is a powerful and suspenseful film that celebrates the bravery and resilience of ordinary people in times of war. The movie’s message is that, despite the hardships and dangers of war, people can work together to overcome adversity and emerge victorious.

Directors:
Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger

Writer:
Emeric Pressburger, Michael Powell

Stars:
Godfrey Tearle, Eric Portman, Hugh Williams

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The Small Back Room (1949)

4/5 (1)

“The Small Back Room” is a 1949 British war film directed by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, and starring David Farrar and Kathleen Byron. The movie tells the story of Sammy Rice, a scientist who is tasked with developing a new type of explosive for the British Army during World War II.

Sammy Rice, played by Farrar, is a talented scientist who suffers from a physical disability and a dependence on alcohol. He is in a turbulent relationship with his girlfriend Susan (played by Byron), who is also struggling with her own personal demons.

Despite his personal struggles, Sammy is determined to complete his work for the Army. He faces a number of challenges, including pressure from his superiors and a series of dangerous accidents in the laboratory. Sammy also becomes embroiled in a tense game of cat and mouse with a German spy who is attempting to steal his research.

As Sammy’s mental and emotional state begins to unravel, he becomes increasingly reliant on Susan for support. However, their relationship is strained as they struggle to come to terms with their own personal demons.

“The Small Back Room” is a character-driven film that explores the psychological toll of war and the impact it can have on individuals. The movie is notable for its use of innovative camera techniques and its portrayal of Sammy’s struggle with disability and addiction. The film’s themes of sacrifice, duty, and personal redemption are timeless and continue to resonate with audiences today.

Directors:
Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger

Writer:
Nigel Balchi, Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger

Stars:
David Farrar, Jack Hawkins, Kathleen Byron

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Go for Broke! (1951)

3/5 (1)

“Go for Broke!” is a 1951 war film directed by Robert Pirosh and starring Van Johnson, who plays the role of Lt. Michael Grayson. The movie tells the story of the 442nd Infantry Regiment, a segregated unit of Japanese-American soldiers who fought for the United States during World War II.

The movie follows Lt. Grayson as he is assigned to lead the 442nd Infantry Regiment, made up entirely of Japanese-American soldiers. Despite initial skepticism from his superiors, Lt. Grayson quickly learns to respect and admire the soldiers under his command.

The soldiers of the 442nd face discrimination both at home and on the battlefield. They are initially treated with suspicion and mistrust by their fellow soldiers and face prejudice from civilians back home. However, they remain committed to their mission and determined to prove their loyalty to the United States.

As the war progresses, the soldiers of the 442nd face intense combat in Italy. They are tasked with some of the most dangerous and difficult missions of the war, including a mission to rescue a lost battalion of American soldiers. The soldiers of the 442nd prove their bravery and determination in the face of overwhelming odds.

The movie’s title, “Go for Broke,” is a phrase that was commonly used by the soldiers of the 442nd, meaning to give it your all, to risk everything, to leave nothing on the table. The movie is a tribute to the soldiers of the 442nd Infantry Regiment and their remarkable achievements despite facing discrimination and prejudice.

“Go for Broke” is considered a landmark film for its portrayal of Japanese-American soldiers and its message of tolerance and inclusion. It was one of the first Hollywood films to feature Asian-American actors in lead roles and helped to raise awareness of the contributions and sacrifices of Japanese-Americans during World War II.

Directors:
Robert Pirosh

Writer:
Robert Pirosh

Stars:
Van Johnson, Lane Nakano, George Miki

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The Way Ahead (1944)

4/5 (1)

“The Way Ahead” is a 1944 British war film directed by Carol Reed and starring David Niven, Stanley Holloway, and William Hartnell. The movie tells the story of a group of civilians who are recruited to join the British Army during World War II and their journey from basic training to the front lines.

The movie begins with a group of mismatched and untrained civilians who are drafted into the Army. They are unsure of what lies ahead and struggle to adjust to military life. However, with the guidance of their tough but fair sergeant (played by Niven), they begin to learn the skills and discipline necessary to become soldiers.

As they progress through training, the soldiers begin to form bonds of camaraderie and mutual respect. They face challenges such as physical training, weapon drills, and live-fire exercises, but they also learn important lessons about leadership, teamwork, and sacrifice.

Eventually, the soldiers are deployed to North Africa, where they face their first taste of combat against the German Army. They must rely on their training and each other to survive and complete their mission.

“The Way Ahead” is a patriotic and uplifting film that celebrates the bravery and sacrifice of ordinary people in times of war. It was made with the support of the British Army and was intended to boost morale during the difficult years of the war. The movie’s message is that everyone has a part to play in the war effort and that by working together, people can achieve great things.

Directors:
Carol Reed

Writer:
Eric Ambler, Peter Ustinov

Stars:
David Niven, Stanley Holloway, James Donald

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49th Parallel-The Invaders (1941)

4/5 (1)

“49th Parallel” is a 1941 war drama directed by Michael Powell and starring Leslie Howard, Laurence Olivier, and Raymond Massey. The movie tells the story of a group of German sailors who become stranded in Canada during World War II.

The sailors are on a mission to gather intelligence and establish a base for the German invasion of North America. However, their plans are thwarted when their U-boat is sunk by the Royal Canadian Air Force. The surviving crew members must now make their way across Canada, avoiding detection by the authorities.

As they travel through Canada, the sailors encounter a variety of characters, including a French-Canadian trapper (played by Olivier), a pacifist writer (played by Howard), and a group of Hutterites (played by Massey and others). These encounters force the sailors to confront their beliefs and assumptions about the world.

The sailors’ journey becomes increasingly desperate as they are pursued by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. They resort to violence and theft to survive, leading to tragic consequences for some of the people they encounter.

In the end, the sailors are brought to justice and forced to confront the consequences of their actions. The movie ends with a message of hope and unity, as the characters from different backgrounds come together to fight against the common enemy of fascism.

“49th Parallel” is notable for its anti-fascist message and its portrayal of Canada as a diverse and multicultural society. The movie was nominated for several Academy Awards, including Best Picture, and is considered a classic of British cinema.

Directors:
Michael Powell

Writer:
Emeric Pressburger, Rodney Ackland

Stars:
Leslie Howard, Laurence Olivier, Raymond Massey

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Black Dragons (1942)

3/5 (1)

“Black Dragons” is a 1942 American film directed by William Nigh and starring Bela Lugosi. The movie tells the story of a group of Japanese agents, led by the mysterious Dr. Melcher (played by Lugosi), who arrive in the United States to carry out a diabolical plan.

The agents assume false identities and begin infiltrating American society. They target wealthy industrialists and businessmen, using their influence to acquire military secrets and technological advancements. However, their true intentions are soon revealed when they begin a series of brutal murders.

As the body count rises, a government agent named Mr. Dick Martin (played by Clayton Moore) is assigned to the case. He teams up with a group of patriotic citizens, including a newspaper reporter named Joan Woodbury (played by Joan Barclay), to track down the elusive Japanese agents and stop their deadly plot.

As the investigation progresses, it becomes clear that Dr. Melcher is the mastermind behind the operation. Martin and his team race against time to stop the Black Dragons before they can cause more destruction.

In the end, the Black Dragons are brought to justice, and their evil plan is foiled. The movie ends on a patriotic note, with a message urging Americans to remain vigilant against the threat of foreign agents and to support their country in its fight against fascism.

Directors:
William Nigh

Writer:
Harvey Gates, Robert Kehoe

Stars:
Bela Lugosi, Joan Barclay, George Pembroke

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The Martyrs of the Alamo (1915) The Birth of Texas

3/5 (1)

“The Martyrs of the Alamo” is a silent film released in 1915, which tells the story of the Battle of the Alamo in San Antonio, Texas, during the Texas Revolution. The movie is considered to be one of the earliest examples of the Hollywood epic genre, and it was directed by Christy Cabanne and produced by D.W. Griffith.

The film begins with the arrival of William Travis, Jim Bowie, and Davy Crockett at the Alamo, which was a former mission that had been converted into a fort by the Texian rebels. The three heroes become friends and prepare to defend the fort against the Mexican army led by General Santa Anna.

The Texans are outnumbered and outgunned, but they fight fiercely and hold off the Mexican army for 13 days. During this time, tensions rise within the Alamo as some of the defenders begin to question whether they should continue fighting or surrender. Travis famously draws a line in the sand and asks all those who are willing to stay and fight to cross it. All of the men do, including Crockett and Bowie, who are later killed in battle.

The final battle is depicted in great detail, with the Texans bravely fighting to the last man. The film ends with the Mexican army victorious and the Alamo in ruins. However, the sacrifice of the Texans at the Alamo inspired others to join the fight for Texas independence, and the film ends with a caption that reads, “Their heroic struggle inspired the birth of Texas.”

“The Martyrs of the Alamo” was a critical and commercial success, and it helped establish Hollywood’s reputation for producing epic films. The movie remains a classic and is considered to be an important part of Texas history, as it tells the story of the brave Texans who fought and died for their independence.

Directors:
Christy Cabanne

Writer:
Christy CabanneTheodosia Harris

Stars:
Sam De Grasse, Allan Sears, Walter Long

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